Tag Archives: People

Do Smoking Bans Make People Smoke Less At Home? Probably

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Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Article Date: 17 Feb 2012 – 0:00 PST

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A study of four European countries with smoke free legislation, published online in Tobacco Control, revealed that smoking bans do not encourage smokers to smoke more at home. According to the researchers, who base their findings on two waves of the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC Project) Europe Surveys, smoking bans may actually encourage smokers to smoke less at home.

The first survey was conducted in 2003-2004, before the smoking ban in public places was enforced in the UK, Ireland, France, Germany and the Netherlands, excluding Scotland, before legislation was enacted. The second survey was conducted after legislation was enacted in 2008-2009.

Around 4,634 smokers (depending on when bans were enacted) in the four countries with smoke-free legislation participated in the surveys, as well as 1,080 smokers in the UK. The UK acted as a comparison country before the smoking ban had come into force.

Before a ban was enacted, the majority of smokers had at least partial restrictions on smoking at home, even though the proportions differed considerably among the four countries. France and Germany had the highest levels of restrictions.

Two of the leading factors linked to choosing to restrict smoking at home was the presence of a young child in the household and supporting a smoking ban in bars.

The researchers found that after the ban came into place, the number of smokers who quit smoking at home increased considerably among all countries by the time of the second survey: 38% in Germany 28% in the Netherlands 25% in Ireland 17% in France The team found that the increase was irrespective of whether the ban allowed for some exceptions or was comprehensive.

Smokers were more likely to ban smoking at home if they supported smoking bans in bars, planned to quit the habit, or when there was a birth of a child.

In the UK, the number of smokers who banned smoking at home also increased by 22% between the two surveys. The second survey was conducted only a few months before the smoking ban came into force.

After the researchers took into account several demographic and smoking history variables, they found that the number of current smokers banning smoking at home rose considerably in Germany, France, the Netherlands and Ireland, but did not considerably rise in the UK.

According to the current theory, public smoking bans either increase the amount of smoking at home as individuals try to compensate “the displacement hypothesis” or encourage smokers to adopt the same ban at home – the social diffusion hypothesis.

The researchers explain:

“Opponents of the workplace or public smoking bans have argued that smoke-free policies – albeit intended to protect non-smokers from tobacco smoke – could lead to displacement of smoking into the home and hence even increase the second hand smoke exposure of non-smoking family members and, most importantly, children.”

Findings from the study support the theory that banning smoking in public places may encourage smokers to ban smoking at home.

Written by Grace Rattue
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. “Towards smoke-free rental cars: an evaluation of voluntary smoking restrictions in California” Georg E Matt et al.
Tob Control doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050231 Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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Grace Rattue. “Do Smoking Bans Make People Smoke Less At Home? Probably.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 17 Feb. 2012. Web.
19 Feb. 2012. APA

Please note: If no author information is provided, the source is cited instead.


posted by Bobby LaGuardia on 17 Feb 2012 at 9:06 am

I dont smoke but allow smokers to smoke freely in my home. When you pay our rent or mortgage you can decide that!

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After A Cancer Diagnosis, Many People Continue To Smoke

Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Also Included In: Lung Cancer;  Colorectal Cancer
Article Date: 24 Jan 2012 – 4:00 PST

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A new analysis has found that a substantial number of lung and colorectal cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study provides valuable information on which cancer patients might need help to quit smoking.

When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, the main focus is to treat the disease. But stopping smoking after a cancer diagnosis is also important because continuing to smoke can negatively affect patients’ responses to treatments, their subsequent cancer risk, and, potentially, their survival. Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH, of the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston, led a team that looked to see how many patients quit smoking around the time of a cancer diagnosis, and which smokers were most likely to quit.

The investigators determined smoking rates around the time of diagnosis and five months after diagnosis in 5,338 lung and colorectal cancer patients. At diagnosis, 39 percent of lung cancer patients and 14 percent of colorectal cancer patients were smoking; five months later, 14 percent of lung cancer patients and 9 percent of colorectal cancer patients were still smoking. These results indicate that a substantial minority of cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed. Also, although lung cancer patients have higher rates of smoking at diagnosis and following diagnosis, colorectal cancer patients are less likely to quit smoking following diagnosis.

Factors and characteristics that predicted continued smoking differed by cancer type. Lung cancer patients who continued smoking tended to have Medicare or other public health insurance, have a lower body mass index, have low emotional support, not have received chemotherapy, not have had surgery, have had prior heart disease, and have smoked a high number of cigarettes per day at some point during their lives. Colorectal cancer patients who continued to smoke tended to be male, have completed less education, be uninsured, not have had surgery, and have once smoked a high number of cigarettes per day.

“These findings can help cancer clinicians identify patients who are at risk for smoking and guide tobacco counseling treatment development for cancer patients,” said Dr. Park.

In an accompanying editorial, Carolyn Dressler, MD, of the Arkansas Department of Health in Little Rock, noted that Dr. Park’s research highlights the critical importance of physicians and other caretakers to address tobacco cessation, particularly at the time of diagnosis. “Most clinicians acknowledge the importance of addressing tobacco cessation in their patients; however, few do it,” she wrote. “We know enough now to implement effective cessation programs to identify and help cancer patients quit at the time of diagnosis and support them to prevent relapse. By doing so, we maximize patients’ response to therapy, their quality of life, and their longevity.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. Article: “A snapshot of smokers following lung and colorectal cancer diagnosis.” Elyse Park, Sandra Japuntich, Nancy A. Rigotti, Lara Traeger, Yulei He, Robert Wallace, Jennifer Malin, Jennifer C. Pandiscio, and Nancy L. Keating. CANCER; Published Online: January 23, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26545).
Editorial: “Oncologists Should Intervene.” Carolyn M. Dresler. CANCER; Published Online: January 23, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26538).
Wiley-Blackwell Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Wiley-Blackwell. “After A Cancer Diagnosis, Many People Continue To Smoke.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 24 Jan. 2012. Web.
14 Feb. 2012. APA

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View the original article here