Tag Archives: Smoke

Number one reason to stop smoking!

This is just nasty! The black is lung cancer and the other is a healthy lung! Remember! millions of people die a year from lung cancer and even if you dont care what you die from everyone around you (including your children) will take in the same stuff that turns lungs black like this. They will actually take in more because while you are taking your cigarette with a filter- they are taking in everything including what that filter is meant to clean out. Just because you are outside or have the windows down in your car DOESNT mean that no one else is taking the same smoke. Also, I love to hear peoples stories! Go ahead and let me know what you are going through. If you are planning on stopping- let me know and I will pray for you! If you have stopped- I would love to hear your story. If you want to learn more about prayer- you can talk to me or call the number 1-888-need-him. It is toll free and they will answer any questions and will pray for you as well! You may not be able to stop alone but with Jesus anything is possible!

Quit Smoking Song!

www.smokingnomore.info The effects of smoking on human health are serious and in many cases, deadly. There are approximately 4000 chemicals in cigarettes, hundreds of which are toxic. The ingredients in cigarettes affect everything from the internal functioning of organs to the efficiency of the bodys immune system. The effects of cigarette smoking are destructive and widespread. "LIVE A LITTLE EXTRA" – Dont Smoke!!

3 Free Stop Smoking Aids

modernlava.com …………….. Looking to stop smoking? There are many methods out there to try to help smokers quit. Some are free and others are not. What works for one person may or may not work for another. Lets take a look at three free stop smoking aids that can help you kick the habit. 1)Smokers Anonymous Smokers Anonymous is a great program to try and help people to quit smoking. What makes Smokers Anonymous so great is that the advisers are usually people who have quit smoking themselves. Therefore, theyve been there and done that. They have the experience to try to help you be successful in your quest to quit smoking. 2)Starting a New Hobby Sometimes something as simple as starting a new hobby can be effective in helping someone to stop smoking. People who picked up a hobby, like gardening for example, found that since the hobby occupied their mind so frequently that their urge to smoke was reduced. It is important to note, however, that you must pick a hobby which you are sincerely interested in. If the thought of collecting stamps bores you to death(I know it does me!), then dont take stamp collecting as a hobby! You will probably end up smoking more cigarettes because you are so bored. 3)Finding a Smoking "Substitution" Another easy to do free stop smoking aid is trying to find some sort of substitution for a cigarette. Often, when a smoker is stressed he or she will reach for a cigarette because it is habit. If the smoker can find something to replace <b>…<b>

Smokeless Cigarettes Free Trial – Try Electronic Cigarette!

tryecigarette.com – Try smokeless cigarettes for free today! Smokeless cigarettes work just like a nicotine patch and nicotine gum which give user their nicotine fix. Updated electronic cigarette electroniccigarettehub.org ecigarette news. Additional electronic cigarette videos www.youtube.com But, theres more to smoking than just getting the nicotine fix. There is a certain fixation about smoking: The way you hold the cigarette, the puffing and seeing the smoke coming out of your mouth. The e-cigarette offers the same smoking experience. You hold it like a cigarette, you puff it like you do a cigarette, and youll see smoke coming out of your mouth like a cigarette. Except that its not a smoke, its vapor. Some people will be able to quit smoking only a week after switching to the smokeless cigarettes! Heres what usually happens: Once people get used to the e-cigarette, they get uncomfortable with the smell of a regular tobacco cigarette smoke. So, they will stop smoking the regular cigarette for good. Following that, they switched to the low-nicotine cartridge and eventually they will stop needing the nicotine fix. Smokers know smoking is bad for health. But, its not the nicotine which makes smoking harmful. Nicotine is like caffeine to a coffee drinker: Its addictive. The e-cigarette is an alternative for those who need the nicotine fix with minimal damage to their body and those around them. The battery-powered, non-flammable device provides a smoking <b>…<b>

Smoke Free Areas Outside Bars Could Stamp Out “Social Smoking”

HomeNewsSmoke Free Areas Outside Bars Could Stamp Out “Social Smoking”

February 21, 2012   A smoking ban in areas immediately outside bars could help curb “social smoking” because this type of smoking tends to go hand in hand with drinking, suggests a small qualitative study published in Tobacco Control. The international evidence suggests that while the overall prevalence of smoking has decreased, social smoking—smoking intermittently or only in given situations—has increased among young adults. Social smokers are not included in the statistics on smoking nor targeted by cessation programs, but they may progress to daily smoking relatively easily. In-depth interviews with social smokers revealed that drinking alcohol prompted cravings for a cigarette, which they wouldn’t otherwise experience. Most participants strongly backed a proposal to mandate smoke free areas outside bars, indicating that it would help them cut down or stop smoking.

For More Information:
http://www.onmedica.com/newsarticle.aspx?id=561a6f27-ddc0-4528-82e9-8ae79b12c807

Feb 24, 2012
Consumers Switching Between Tobacco Types
Read the full story Feb 24, 2012
Daytona Speedway to Ban Smoking
Read the full story Feb 23, 2012
More Troops on Smokeless Tobacco After Deployment
Read the full story Feb 23, 2012
Physicians Lack Confidence in Their Ability to Counsel Cancer Patients to Quit Smoking
Read the full story

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Do Smoking Bans Make People Smoke Less At Home? Probably

Editor’s Choice
Academic Journal
Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Article Date: 17 Feb 2012 – 0:00 PST

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A study of four European countries with smoke free legislation, published online in Tobacco Control, revealed that smoking bans do not encourage smokers to smoke more at home. According to the researchers, who base their findings on two waves of the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC Project) Europe Surveys, smoking bans may actually encourage smokers to smoke less at home.

The first survey was conducted in 2003-2004, before the smoking ban in public places was enforced in the UK, Ireland, France, Germany and the Netherlands, excluding Scotland, before legislation was enacted. The second survey was conducted after legislation was enacted in 2008-2009.

Around 4,634 smokers (depending on when bans were enacted) in the four countries with smoke-free legislation participated in the surveys, as well as 1,080 smokers in the UK. The UK acted as a comparison country before the smoking ban had come into force.

Before a ban was enacted, the majority of smokers had at least partial restrictions on smoking at home, even though the proportions differed considerably among the four countries. France and Germany had the highest levels of restrictions.

Two of the leading factors linked to choosing to restrict smoking at home was the presence of a young child in the household and supporting a smoking ban in bars.

The researchers found that after the ban came into place, the number of smokers who quit smoking at home increased considerably among all countries by the time of the second survey: 38% in Germany 28% in the Netherlands 25% in Ireland 17% in France The team found that the increase was irrespective of whether the ban allowed for some exceptions or was comprehensive.

Smokers were more likely to ban smoking at home if they supported smoking bans in bars, planned to quit the habit, or when there was a birth of a child.

In the UK, the number of smokers who banned smoking at home also increased by 22% between the two surveys. The second survey was conducted only a few months before the smoking ban came into force.

After the researchers took into account several demographic and smoking history variables, they found that the number of current smokers banning smoking at home rose considerably in Germany, France, the Netherlands and Ireland, but did not considerably rise in the UK.

According to the current theory, public smoking bans either increase the amount of smoking at home as individuals try to compensate “the displacement hypothesis” or encourage smokers to adopt the same ban at home – the social diffusion hypothesis.

The researchers explain:

“Opponents of the workplace or public smoking bans have argued that smoke-free policies – albeit intended to protect non-smokers from tobacco smoke – could lead to displacement of smoking into the home and hence even increase the second hand smoke exposure of non-smoking family members and, most importantly, children.”

Findings from the study support the theory that banning smoking in public places may encourage smokers to ban smoking at home.

Written by Grace Rattue
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. “Towards smoke-free rental cars: an evaluation of voluntary smoking restrictions in California” Georg E Matt et al.
Tob Control doi:10.1136/tobaccocontrol-2011-050231 Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

Grace Rattue. “Do Smoking Bans Make People Smoke Less At Home? Probably.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 17 Feb. 2012. Web.
19 Feb. 2012. APA

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posted by Bobby LaGuardia on 17 Feb 2012 at 9:06 am

I dont smoke but allow smokers to smoke freely in my home. When you pay our rent or mortgage you can decide that!

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After A Cancer Diagnosis, Many People Continue To Smoke

Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Also Included In: Lung Cancer;  Colorectal Cancer
Article Date: 24 Jan 2012 – 4:00 PST

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A new analysis has found that a substantial number of lung and colorectal cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study provides valuable information on which cancer patients might need help to quit smoking.

When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, the main focus is to treat the disease. But stopping smoking after a cancer diagnosis is also important because continuing to smoke can negatively affect patients’ responses to treatments, their subsequent cancer risk, and, potentially, their survival. Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH, of the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston, led a team that looked to see how many patients quit smoking around the time of a cancer diagnosis, and which smokers were most likely to quit.

The investigators determined smoking rates around the time of diagnosis and five months after diagnosis in 5,338 lung and colorectal cancer patients. At diagnosis, 39 percent of lung cancer patients and 14 percent of colorectal cancer patients were smoking; five months later, 14 percent of lung cancer patients and 9 percent of colorectal cancer patients were still smoking. These results indicate that a substantial minority of cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed. Also, although lung cancer patients have higher rates of smoking at diagnosis and following diagnosis, colorectal cancer patients are less likely to quit smoking following diagnosis.

Factors and characteristics that predicted continued smoking differed by cancer type. Lung cancer patients who continued smoking tended to have Medicare or other public health insurance, have a lower body mass index, have low emotional support, not have received chemotherapy, not have had surgery, have had prior heart disease, and have smoked a high number of cigarettes per day at some point during their lives. Colorectal cancer patients who continued to smoke tended to be male, have completed less education, be uninsured, not have had surgery, and have once smoked a high number of cigarettes per day.

“These findings can help cancer clinicians identify patients who are at risk for smoking and guide tobacco counseling treatment development for cancer patients,” said Dr. Park.

In an accompanying editorial, Carolyn Dressler, MD, of the Arkansas Department of Health in Little Rock, noted that Dr. Park’s research highlights the critical importance of physicians and other caretakers to address tobacco cessation, particularly at the time of diagnosis. “Most clinicians acknowledge the importance of addressing tobacco cessation in their patients; however, few do it,” she wrote. “We know enough now to implement effective cessation programs to identify and help cancer patients quit at the time of diagnosis and support them to prevent relapse. By doing so, we maximize patients’ response to therapy, their quality of life, and their longevity.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. Article: “A snapshot of smokers following lung and colorectal cancer diagnosis.” Elyse Park, Sandra Japuntich, Nancy A. Rigotti, Lara Traeger, Yulei He, Robert Wallace, Jennifer Malin, Jennifer C. Pandiscio, and Nancy L. Keating. CANCER; Published Online: January 23, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26545).
Editorial: “Oncologists Should Intervene.” Carolyn M. Dresler. CANCER; Published Online: January 23, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26538).
Wiley-Blackwell Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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Wiley-Blackwell. “After A Cancer Diagnosis, Many People Continue To Smoke.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 24 Jan. 2012. Web.
14 Feb. 2012. APA

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Teen Secondhand Smoke Exposure Down, But Not Enough

Editor’s Choice
Academic Journal
Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Also Included In: Pediatrics / Children’s Health
Article Date: 06 Feb 2012 – 9:00 PST

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5 stars5 stars
Secondhand Smoke (SHS) exposure among middle and high school students in the USA has dropped over the last ten years, researchers from the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion and the CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) reported in the March edition of Pediatrics. The authors explained that passengers in cars who accompany smokers run significant health risks, especially if they are children and teenagers.

Even though exposure has gone down over the last decade, 22.8% of students who did not smoke reported that they had breathed in environmental tobacco smoke during the previous seven days – 75.3% of smoking students had done so too.

Secondhand smoke, also known as environmental tobacco smoke, or passive smoking, refers to the unintended inhalation of tobacco smoke by other people, apart from the intended active smoker.

The authors explain that passive smoking can lead to: middle ear diseasedelayed lung growthexacerbations of asthma symptomsacute respiratory infectionsBrian A. King, PhD, MPH, and team set out to determine how much exposure there was among teenagers to secondhand smoke in nonpublic areas, especially cars and other motor vehicles. The authors explained that most previous studies had focused on environmental tobacco smoke exposure in the home.

Ich.Autofahrend.2006.MB
Non-smokers who sit with a smoking driver/passanger will inhale secondhand smoke

They gathered data from the National Youth Tobacco Survey for the years, 2009, 2006, 2004, 2002 and 2000. The survey is said to be a nationally representative one of sixth to twelfth graders. They assessed SHS exposure in motor vehicles across school years, gender and race/ethnicity.

They found that: SHS exposure dropped from 39% among non smokers in 2000, to 22.8% in 2009.SHS exposure fell from 82.3% among smokers in 2000, to 75.3% in 2009.In an Abstract in the journal, the authors concluded:

“SHS exposure in cars decreased significantly among US middle and high school students from 2000 to 2009. Nevertheless, in 2009, over one-fifth of nonsmoking students were exposed to SHS in cars. Jurisdictions should expand comprehensive smoke-free policies that prohibit smoking in worksites and public places to also prohibit smoking in motor vehicles occupied by youth.”

Written by Christian Nordqvist
Copyright: Medical News Today
Not to be reproduced without permission of Medical News Today

Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. “Secondhand Smoke Exposure in Cars Among Middle and High School Students – United States, 2000-2009”
Brian A. King, PhD, MPH, Shanta R. Dube, PhD, MPH, and Michael A. Tynan, BA
Pediatrics February 6, 2012. doi: 10.1542/peds.2011-2307 Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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Christian Nordqvist. “Teen Secondhand Smoke Exposure Down, But Not Enough.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 6 Feb. 2012. Web.
14 Feb. 2012. APA

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posted by Jesse on 6 Feb 2012 at 9:53 am

Will anyone think of the children? OMG please think of the children, poor children, such a tragedy. I’m going to call my state representatives to come up with new laws to forbid anything that harms the children. That includes forbidding them from running in the park because they can fall and get hurt. OMG the children.

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posted by Candace Krestel on 7 Feb 2012 at 6:00 am

I smoke but always am considerate of others. I always ask if they mind my smoking. I don’t smoke in other peoples houses and I think it’s wrong to smoke with kids in the car. As far as making it a law this is just another way to control what people are doing. Why don’t they ban drinking because that’s a killer too but it’s still legal because it makes money.

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