Tag Archives: Tobacco

Tobacco Added in to the Cocktail Mix

HomeNewsTobacco Added in to the Cocktail Mix

February 17, 2012   It’s a freezing cold weekday night and I find myself in a place called Barts – a discreet, prohibition-style cocktail bar in the heart of Chelsea, brimming with stuffed animals, quirky antiques and young professionals – many of them drinking cocktails made with tobacco liqueur. Tobacco as an ingredient in drinks isn’t completely new, but it is rare. Back in 2003, a group of Floridian cocktail makers began making tobacco-spiked cocktails in an attempt to defy the smoking ban. One such drink was the ‘Nicotini’ made using vodka infused with tobacco leaves – its purpose being to recreate the effects of a cigarette. At the same time in New York, cocktail makers were trying to recreate the taste of cigarettes with drinks like the ‘Smokeless Manhattan’ made of port, Laphroaig whisky and orange bitters, which apparently tasted like a Marlboro Red.

For More Information:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/wordofmouth/2012/feb/17/tobacco-cocktails?newsfeed=true

Feb 17, 2012
Why All Hospital Campuses Should be Smoke-Free
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Tobacco Added in to the Cocktail Mix
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Smokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Electronic Cigarette Explodes in Man’s Mouth
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UM Tobacco Ban Yields Only 3 Referrals Since Becoming Mandatory Jan 1

HomeNewsUM Tobacco Ban Yields Only 3 Referrals Since Becoming Mandatory Jan 1

February 13, 2012   The University of Maine’s Tobacco-Free Campus Initiative has been a mandatory policy since the beginning of the semester. But since Jan. 1, the ban has caused only three referrals for cigarette use, according to David Fiacco, director of Community Standards, Rights and Responsibilities.

“We think it’s going very well,” said Dean of Students Robert Dana. “There’s been another substantial decline in smoking-related behaviors.” The updated policy introduced stricter enforcement and mandatory compliance. Dana said more students and faculty have been asking for help quitting tobacco products. “That was sort of the plan from the public health perspective,” Dana said. “We expected people probably would be fully invested in the change process. “We hoped that people would come forward if they needed some help,” he continued. “It seems to be working.”

For More Information:
http://mainecampus.com/2012/02/13/um-tobacco-ban-yields-only-3-referrals-since-becoming-mandatory-jan-1/

Feb 17, 2012
Why All Hospital Campuses Should be Smoke-Free
Read the full story Feb 17, 2012
Tobacco Added in to the Cocktail Mix
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Smokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Electronic Cigarette Explodes in Man’s Mouth
Read the full story

Complete the form below to subscribe to the ActionToQuit listserv. Join the conversation about tobacco control policy and receive weekly updates.

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View the original article here

Smokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer

HomeNewsSmokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer

February 16, 2012   In 20 seasons, Tony Gwynn proved to be one of the most prolific hitters in baseball. Now he steps up to a much more formidable opponent—cancer. Gwynn has had four procedures to remove a cancerous tumor from the right side of his mouth. The Hall of Fame outfielder strongly believes that his tumors resulted from a lengthy history of smokeless tobacco use. Gwynn reportedly started while playing rookie ball to calm his nerves, but soon he became addicted. He claims to have used one and a half cans each day. Recently, to prohibit young baseball fans from starting to use tobacco, Major League Baseball and the players union agreed that players wouldn’t carry smokeless tobacco in their pockets when fans are present at the ballparks or use it during interviews or team functions. Many health organizations and several congressmen have pushed for a full ban.

For More Information:
http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2012/feb/16/smokeless-tobacco-may-have-led-to-gwynns-cancer/

Feb 17, 2012
Why All Hospital Campuses Should be Smoke-Free
Read the full story Feb 17, 2012
Tobacco Added in to the Cocktail Mix
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Smokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Electronic Cigarette Explodes in Man’s Mouth
Read the full story

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View the original article here

New Book Examines Impact of the U.S. Tobacco Industry

HomeNewsNew Book Examines Impact of the U.S. Tobacco Industry

February 14, 2012   Anthropologist Peter Benson, PhD, released a new book titled “Tobacco Capitalism” that examines the impact of tobacco production in the United States on farmers, workers, and the public. He explains that the tobacco industry is increasingly purchasing their tobacco leaves from developing countries, pressuring American farmers to lower their prices to compete with overseas producers.  Many American farmers are hiring undocumented migrant farm workers to compete economically, putting them at the center of contentious political debates about illegal immigration. These migrant workers live in “labor camps” with poor living conditions, and have little access to resources like health care, legal services, and employment benefits. Benson also discusses tobacco industry marketing strategies, which have undergone what he calls a “corporate social responsibility makeover,” shifting responsibility from the companies (for making a harmful product) to consumers (for supposedly choosing it) and claiming to create “safer” tobacco products.

For More Information:
http://www.healthnewsdigest.com/news/Book_Review_440/New_Book_Examines_Impact_of_U_S_Tobacco_Industry_printer.shtml

Feb 14, 2012
New Book Examines Impact of the U.S. Tobacco Industry
Read the full story Feb 14, 2012
Smoke-Free Laws Lead to Less Smoking At Home
Read the full story Feb 13, 2012
UM Tobacco Ban Yields Only 3 Referrals Since Becoming Mandatory Jan. 1
Read the full story Feb 13, 2012
Largest Addiction Treatment Facility in Central Texas Says, ‘No smoking’
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The Biggest Killers Of Japanese Adults Are Tobacco Smoking And High Blood Pressure

Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Also Included In: Hypertension;  Cardiovascular / Cardiology
Article Date: 25 Jan 2012 – 1:00 PST

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The life expectancy of a person born in Japan is among the highest in the world (82.9 years) yet tobacco smoking and high blood pressure are still the major risk factors for death among adults in Japan, emphasizing the need to reduce tobacco smoking and to improve ongoing programs designed to help people manage multiple cardiovascular risk factors, including high blood pressure, according to a study published in this week’s PLoS Medicine.

In an analysis of available data led by Nayu Ikeda from the University of Tokyo in Japan, the authors found that in Japan in 2007, tobacco smoking and high blood pressure accounted for 129,000 and 104,000 deaths, respectively, among adults aged 30 years and over. Physical inactivity accounted for 52,000 deaths, high blood glucose and high dietary salt intake accounted for 34,000 deaths each, and alcohol use for 31,000 deaths. Furthermore, the authors found that life expectancy at age 40 would have been extended by 1.4 years for both sexes, if exposure to multiple cardiovascular risk factors had been reduced to an optimal level.

According to the authors, in order to sustain the trend of longevity in Japan for the 21st century, additional efforts in a variety of fields are required for decreasing adult mortality from chronic diseases and injuries. They say: “A first step will be to powerfully promote effective programs for smoking cessation.”

Tobacco smoking is deeply rooted in Japanese society, but the authors argue that health professionals can play a big role: “Health care professionals, including physicians, who are highly conscious of the harms of tobacco will play the primary role in treatment of smoking and creating an environment for implementation of stringent tobacco control policies.

As for high blood pressure, the authors say: “it is urgent to establish a monitoring system for management of high blood pressure at the national level. Further investigation through national health surveys will help understand factors that contribute to the inadequate control of blood pressure in the Japanese population.”

The authors conclude: “Measuring the quality of the care that is actually delivered by interventions will be of paramount importance in the assessment of current policies and programs for the treatment of multiple cardiovascular risks including hypertension. These concerted actions in research, public health, clinical practice, and policymaking will be the key for maintaining good population health in the aging society.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. Funding: This research was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare (H22-seisaku-shitei-033) and a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (No. 2239013). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.
Citation: Ikeda N, Inoue M, Iso H, Ikeda S, Satoh T, et al. (2012) Adult Mortality Attributable to Preventable Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases and Injuries in Japan: A Comparative Risk Assessment. PLoS Med 9(1): e1001160. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1001160
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