Tag Archives: Cancer

Chest X-Ray Electronic Cigarettes Before and After Smoking Health harmful

In this episode Shawn from www.zeecigs.com reveals the results of his Chest x-ray comparison of a before and after snapshot. In this Episode we compare a chest x-ray before and after which is an interesting view. His volcano like smoking was heavy at two plus packs a day. Shawn Switched to Electronic Cigarettes in 2009. This video is NOT promoting health of ecigs and you should not start ecigs unless you are a long time smoker. This video was added as it was mentioned as an idea in a previous e-cig video a few years ago. youtu.be

How to quit smoking cigarette/YOU CAN DO IT AS YOU SEE_http://www.turkishenglishtranslator.com/

turkishenglishtranslator.com To quit smoking is possible only by reducing the acidity of our body. what increases our body acidty : 1)Lack of Faith:If we make a careful research we shall see that people who have faith and perform their prayers in Islamic countries almost do not smoke at all .Praying throws the negative feelings from human brain,keeps you self-confident and prevents nervousness,stress causing the body acidity. 2)Refined foods and too much consumption of meat : increases the acidty of our body.By consuming natural foods and les meat your body will be balanced and will not need to smoke Herebelow are some refined foods: White flour products(sandwiches,pizzas,cakes, ,etc):have almost no nutritional value and contain various chemical ingredients so as to have a better appearance,mouth-feel..Best way of consuming wheat is buying wholewheat bread,bulgur or making our own bread at home with fresh ground whole wheat flour. White rice,salt,sugar: polished rice (without bran) also loses all the vitamins, minerals and causes acidity in our metabolism. right alternative is natural,branned rice. White sugar: and its derivatives like chocolates,ice-creams,puddings,cakes,etc. are subject to many chemical applications till they become refined and granulated and increase acidty.We can obtain sugar from legumes ,cereals, fruits, vegetables and dairy products naturally. Ready made vinegars,tomato pastes,soups,puddings,pickles,tinned vegetables: also cause acidty and we must <b>…<b>

Number one reason to stop smoking!

This is just nasty! The black is lung cancer and the other is a healthy lung! Remember! millions of people die a year from lung cancer and even if you dont care what you die from everyone around you (including your children) will take in the same stuff that turns lungs black like this. They will actually take in more because while you are taking your cigarette with a filter- they are taking in everything including what that filter is meant to clean out. Just because you are outside or have the windows down in your car DOESNT mean that no one else is taking the same smoke. Also, I love to hear peoples stories! Go ahead and let me know what you are going through. If you are planning on stopping- let me know and I will pray for you! If you have stopped- I would love to hear your story. If you want to learn more about prayer- you can talk to me or call the number 1-888-need-him. It is toll free and they will answer any questions and will pray for you as well! You may not be able to stop alone but with Jesus anything is possible!

Physicians Lack Confidence in Their Ability to Counsel Cancer Patients to Quit Smoking

HomeNewsPhysicians Lack Confidence in Their Ability to Counsel Cancer Patients to Quit Smoking

February 23, 2012   Less than one-fifth (18.1%) of healthcare providers reported high levels of confidence in their ability to counsel patients with cancer to quit smoking, a survey published in The Oncologist found. These results suggest “outpatient oncology providers may not be using the ‘teachable moment’ of cancer diagnosis to provide smoking-cessation assistance,” the investigators noted. Of the 74 physicians and midlevel providers surveyed, 82.4% frequently or always assessed smoking in new patients, but rates declined at subsequent visits. Rates of advising patients to quit smoking were also high, but <30% of providers reported frequently or always providing intervention to patients who smoked, and only 30% reported following up with patients to assess progress with quitting. Additional training and clinic-based interventions may help improve adherence to tobacco-cessation practice guidelines in the outpatient oncology setting. The most important barrier to smoking cessation was a patient’s lack of motivation.

For More Information:
http://www.chemotherapyadvisor.com/teachable-moments-for-smoking-cessation-in-patients-diagnosed-with-cancer-underutilized/article/227993/  

Feb 24, 2012
Consumers Switching Between Tobacco Types
Read the full story Feb 24, 2012
Daytona Speedway to Ban Smoking
Read the full story Feb 23, 2012
More Troops on Smokeless Tobacco After Deployment
Read the full story Feb 23, 2012
Physicians Lack Confidence in Their Ability to Counsel Cancer Patients to Quit Smoking
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Smokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer

HomeNewsSmokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer

February 16, 2012   In 20 seasons, Tony Gwynn proved to be one of the most prolific hitters in baseball. Now he steps up to a much more formidable opponent—cancer. Gwynn has had four procedures to remove a cancerous tumor from the right side of his mouth. The Hall of Fame outfielder strongly believes that his tumors resulted from a lengthy history of smokeless tobacco use. Gwynn reportedly started while playing rookie ball to calm his nerves, but soon he became addicted. He claims to have used one and a half cans each day. Recently, to prohibit young baseball fans from starting to use tobacco, Major League Baseball and the players union agreed that players wouldn’t carry smokeless tobacco in their pockets when fans are present at the ballparks or use it during interviews or team functions. Many health organizations and several congressmen have pushed for a full ban.

For More Information:
http://www.postandcourier.com/news/2012/feb/16/smokeless-tobacco-may-have-led-to-gwynns-cancer/

Feb 17, 2012
Why All Hospital Campuses Should be Smoke-Free
Read the full story Feb 17, 2012
Tobacco Added in to the Cocktail Mix
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Smokeless Tobacco May Have Led to Outfielder Tony Gwynn’s Cancer
Read the full story Feb 16, 2012
Electronic Cigarette Explodes in Man’s Mouth
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After A Cancer Diagnosis, Many People Continue To Smoke

Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Also Included In: Lung Cancer;  Colorectal Cancer
Article Date: 24 Jan 2012 – 4:00 PST

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A new analysis has found that a substantial number of lung and colorectal cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study provides valuable information on which cancer patients might need help to quit smoking.

When a patient receives a cancer diagnosis, the main focus is to treat the disease. But stopping smoking after a cancer diagnosis is also important because continuing to smoke can negatively affect patients’ responses to treatments, their subsequent cancer risk, and, potentially, their survival. Elyse R. Park, PhD, MPH, of the Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School in Boston, led a team that looked to see how many patients quit smoking around the time of a cancer diagnosis, and which smokers were most likely to quit.

The investigators determined smoking rates around the time of diagnosis and five months after diagnosis in 5,338 lung and colorectal cancer patients. At diagnosis, 39 percent of lung cancer patients and 14 percent of colorectal cancer patients were smoking; five months later, 14 percent of lung cancer patients and 9 percent of colorectal cancer patients were still smoking. These results indicate that a substantial minority of cancer patients continue to smoke after being diagnosed. Also, although lung cancer patients have higher rates of smoking at diagnosis and following diagnosis, colorectal cancer patients are less likely to quit smoking following diagnosis.

Factors and characteristics that predicted continued smoking differed by cancer type. Lung cancer patients who continued smoking tended to have Medicare or other public health insurance, have a lower body mass index, have low emotional support, not have received chemotherapy, not have had surgery, have had prior heart disease, and have smoked a high number of cigarettes per day at some point during their lives. Colorectal cancer patients who continued to smoke tended to be male, have completed less education, be uninsured, not have had surgery, and have once smoked a high number of cigarettes per day.

“These findings can help cancer clinicians identify patients who are at risk for smoking and guide tobacco counseling treatment development for cancer patients,” said Dr. Park.

In an accompanying editorial, Carolyn Dressler, MD, of the Arkansas Department of Health in Little Rock, noted that Dr. Park’s research highlights the critical importance of physicians and other caretakers to address tobacco cessation, particularly at the time of diagnosis. “Most clinicians acknowledge the importance of addressing tobacco cessation in their patients; however, few do it,” she wrote. “We know enough now to implement effective cessation programs to identify and help cancer patients quit at the time of diagnosis and support them to prevent relapse. By doing so, we maximize patients’ response to therapy, their quality of life, and their longevity.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. Article: “A snapshot of smokers following lung and colorectal cancer diagnosis.” Elyse Park, Sandra Japuntich, Nancy A. Rigotti, Lara Traeger, Yulei He, Robert Wallace, Jennifer Malin, Jennifer C. Pandiscio, and Nancy L. Keating. CANCER; Published Online: January 23, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26545).
Editorial: “Oncologists Should Intervene.” Carolyn M. Dresler. CANCER; Published Online: January 23, 2012 (DOI: 10.1002/cncr.26538).
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14 Feb. 2012. APA

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Erlotinib Dose-Adjusted For Smoking Status Effective As First Treatment For Head And Neck Cancer

Main Category: Cancer / Oncology
Also Included In: Ear, Nose and Throat;  Smoking / Quit Smoking
Article Date: 27 Jan 2012 – 4:00 PST

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Head and neck cancers respond well to the anti-cancer drug erlotinib when it is administered before surgery and a stronger dose is given to patients who smoke, according to a study presented at the Multidisciplinary Head and Neck Cancer Symposium, sponsored by AHNS, ASCO, ASTRO and SNM.

Erlotinib is an oral anti-cancer drug that can slow a tumor’s growth and spread by inhibiting specific growth receptors on the surface of the cancer cells. Early detection of a patient’s response to EGFR inhibitors, such as erlotinib, is critical to personalizing head and neck cancer treatments.

In a first of its kind study in patients with head and neck cancer, researchers sought to determine how well tumors unaffected by other therapies respond to erlotinib, when the drug dose was adjusted according to the patient’s smoking status. It has been recently shown that smokers metabolize the drug faster than nonsmokers.

Nonsmokers received 150 mg per day and smokers received 300 mg per day for at least 14 days before surgery. A FDG-PET scan and neck CT was performed before treatment and at the end of erlotinib administration. In addition, an early FDG-PET was performed after four to six days of treatment.

The results showed that erlotinib is effective as a first line of therapy when the dose is adjusted per smoking status, even when used for a limited duration. Both smokers and nonsmokers tolerated the dose of erlotinib and neither experienced serious adverse effects. The study also showed that the FDG-PET scan taken early can show changes in the standard uptake value and predict a patient’s response to erlotinib.

“We hope our results will motivate clinicians to consider and investigate further the use of erlotinib in patients with head and neck cancer and adjust the dose for smoking status,” Mercedes Porosnicu, MD, lead author of the study and an assistant professor of internal medicine at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston Salem, N.C., said. “We also hope that our study will help better select the patients expected to respond to erlotinib.”

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our cancer / oncology section for the latest news on this subject. The abstract, “Pilot study to evaluation the effect of erlotinib administered before surgery in operable patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN),” was presented as a poster presentation.
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American Society for Radiation Oncology. “Erlotinib Dose-Adjusted For Smoking Status Effective As First Treatment For Head And Neck Cancer.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 27 Jan. 2012. Web.
14 Feb. 2012. APA

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Identifying Patients With Increased Risk From Throat Cancer

Main Category: Ear, Nose and Throat
Also Included In: Cancer / Oncology;  Smoking / Quit Smoking;  Cervical Cancer / HPV Vaccine
Article Date: 18 Jan 2012 – 0:00 PST

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Independent of other factors, such as smoking history and HPV status, matted lymph nodes appear to signal increased chance of oropharyngeal cancer spreading to other parts of the body

Researchers at the University of Michigan Health System have found a new indicator that may predict which patients with a common type of throat cancer are most likely have the cancer spread to other parts of their bodies.

Patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma who had “matted” lymph nodes – nodes that are connected together – had a 69 percent survival rate over three years, compared to 94 percent for patients without matted nodes, according to a study published online ahead of print publication in Head & Neck.

The oropharynx is an area that includes the back of the tongue, soft palate, throat and tonsils.

“The spread of cancer throughout the body accounts for about 45 percent of the deaths from oropharyngeal carcinoma,” says the study’s senior author, Douglas B. Chepeha, M.D., M.S.P.H., an associate professor of otolaryngology head and neck surgery at the U-M Medical School. “Our findings may help doctors identify patients who are at higher risk for having their cancer metastasize and who would benefit from additional systemic therapy. Conversely, some patients without matted nodes may benefit from a reduction of the current standard treatment, which would cut down on uncomfortable side effects.”

Notably, the findings indicate an increased risk independent of other established prognostic factors, such as the patient’s history of smoking or whether they have the Human papillomavirus (HPV), the study found. Smoking (tobacco and marijuana), heavy alcohol use and HPV infection have each been linked to the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

Matted nodes appear to be an especially strong indicator of increased risk among patients who are HPV-positive, even though HPV-positive patients had better overall outcomes than their HPV-negative peers. The patients with the best outcomes were HPV-positive non-smokers.

“It’s not clear why we’re finding these survival differences for patients who have matted nodes,” says study lead author Matthew E. Spector, M.D., a head and neck surgery resident at U-M who won a national award from the American Head and Neck Society for this work. “It is possible that there are biological and molecular differences in these types of tumors, which can be explored in future research.”

The results affirm the value of having a team of doctors and researchers from different specialties – radiology, oncology, biostatistics and surgery – working together to find advances that can directly benefit patients, Chepeha says. “This was a collaborative effort and all of the authors made important contributions,” he adds.

The study tracked 78 cancer patients who were part of a clinical trial evaluating two cancer drugs in combination with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. All the patients had stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx and had not had any previous treatment. Sixteen of the 78 patients had matted nodes.

“It’s significant that we’ve identified this new marker that can help us predict which patients have worse survival odds,” Chepeha says. “Now we need to go one step further and figure out what mechanisms are at work and how we can use this knowledge to improve survival rates.”

Head and neck cancer statistics: An estimated 52,140 people will be diagnosed with head and neck cancer this year, and an estimated 11,460 people will die from the disease, according to the American Cancer Society.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our ear, nose and throat section for the latest news on this subject. Additional authors: K. Kelly Gallagher, M.D.; Emily Light, M.S.; Mohannad Ibrahim, M.D.; Eric J. Chanowski; Jeffrey S. Moyer, M.D.; Mark E. Prince, M.D.; Gregory T. Wolf, M.D.; Carol R. Bradford, M.D.; Kitrina Cordell, D.D.S, M.S.; Jonathan B. McHugh, M.D.; Thomas Carey, Ph.D.; Francis P. Worden, M.D.; Avraham Eisbruch, M.D., all of U-M.
Disclosure: None.
Funding: The research was supported by a Specialized Program of Research Excellence (SPORE) in Head and Neck Cancer grant from the National Cancer Institute.
Citation: “Matted Nodes Are Associated With A Poor Prognosis In Oreopharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Independent of HPV and EGFR Status,” Head & Neck, Jan. 13, 2012.
University of Michigan Health System Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

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University of Michigan Health System. “Identifying Patients With Increased Risk From Throat Cancer.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 18 Jan. 2012. Web.
14 Feb. 2012. APA

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