Tag Archives: Heart

Justin’s HIV Journal Justin Tries To Quit Smoking

Justin B Smith from Justins HIV Journal has been smoking since the age of 17. He is 29 years old so he has been smoking for about 12 years. According to TheBody.com, people with HIV disease are more likely to smoke than healthy people. Smoking can interfere with normal lung function in healthy people. In people with HIV, smoking can make it more difficult to fight off serious infections. People with HIV disease are now living longer. Smoking and related problems can interfere with long term quality of life. Smoking weakens the immune system. It can make it harder to fight off HIV-related infections. This is especially true for infections related to the lungs. Smoking can interfere with processing of medications by the liver. It can also worsen liver problems like hepatitis. People with HIV who smoke are more likely to suffer complications from HIV medication than those who dont. For example, those who smoke are more likely to experience nausea and vomiting from taking HIV medications. Smoking increases the risk of some long-term side effects of HIV disease and treatment. These include osteoporosis . HIV treatment slightly increases the risk of heart attack, but smoking is the major controllable risk factor for heart attacks or strokes. Recent studies found that quitting smoking reduced heart attack risk in HIV patients more than other factors such as changes in medications. People with HIV disease who smoke are more likely to develop several opportunistic infections <b>…<b>

Earn Thousands of Dollars By Quitting Smoking

Everyone knows smoking is bad for them, and they even know theyll save money if they quit, but since more people who are poor smoke than more affluent people, quitting smoking can mean huge savings that can be directed to more worthy and fulfilling pursuits. And since smoking causes serious disease, as well as less severe chronic illnesses like colds, quitting smoking will also reduce the costs of treating various illnesses, and hopefully reverse any advancing diseases like Emphysema or Lung Cancer etc.

Nicotine’s Role In Promoting Heart And Blood Vessel Disease – Invade And Conquer

Main Category: Smoking / Quit Smoking
Also Included In: Heart Disease;  Cardiovascular / Cardiology
Article Date: 24 Feb 2012 – 4:00 PST

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Cigarette smoke has long been considered the main risk factor for heart disease. But new research from Brown University in Providence, R.I., shows that nicotine itself, a component of cigarette smoke, can contribute to the disease process by changing cell structure in a way that promotes migration and invasion of the smooth muscle cells that line blood vessels. In particular, invading cells can remodel structures called podosomes, and this leads to further degradation of vessel integrity.

Ultimately, this cellular migration and invasion process gives rise to the formation of vessel-clogging fatty deposits known as plaque – the hallmark of heart and blood vessel disease. The results on the nicotine-podosome link will be presented at the 56th Annual Meeting of the Biophysical Society (BPS), held Feb. 25-29 in San Diego, Calif.

If confirmed in further studies, the finding that nicotine itself promotes vessel damage by changing podosomes appears to question the health benefits of helping people quit smoking through smokeless nicotine delivery agents such as gum or patches.

“The finding that nicotine is as effective as cigarette smoke in enhancing cellular structural changes, and breakdown of scaffold proteins by vascular smooth muscle cells, suggests that replacing cigarette smoking by nicotine treatment may have limited beneficial effects on atherosclerosis,” notes lead researcher Chi-Ming Hai, professor of medical science in the department of molecular pharmacology, physiology, and biotechnology at Brown University.

Hai’s research illuminates the multistep process of plaque formation, and suggests that a new powerful player, nicotine, may be involved. The plaque formation process begins as a response to cellular injury, and progresses to destructive and chronic inflammation of the vessel walls that attracts mobs of white blood cells, further inflaming the vessels. This damage-causing inflammation can be triggered by chemical insults from high blood sugar, modified low-density lipoproteins (LDL, the “bad cholesterol“), physical stress from high blood pressure, or chemical insult from tobacco smoke. Now nicotine itself appears to remodel key structures in a way that primes and enhances the invasion of smooth muscle lining the vessel wall.

Identifying a possible nicotine-posodome link in the invasion step of plaque formation process suggests a new means of intervening in the process: targeting the cell structures that are changed by nicotine and that promote invasion of the smooth muscle lining the vessel wall. If a therapy could prevent, slow, or reverse that step, it would likely interrupt the plaque-production cycle.

Fatty deposits accumulate in blood vessels beginning as young as age 10 and progress over a person’s lifetime. Heart disease results if the deposits continue to build and harden into vessel-clogging plaque. When plaque ruptures, it can block blood flow, starving the heart or brain of oxygen and leading to a heart attack or stroke.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our smoking / quit smoking section for the latest news on this subject. The presentation, “Cigarette smoke and nicotine-induced remodeling of actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix by vascular smooth muscle cells,” is at 1:45 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 26, 2012, in the San Diego Convention Center, Hall FGH. ABSTRACT: http://tinyurl.com/73e836j
Meeting Home Page: http://www.biophysics.org/2012meeting/Main/tabid/2386/Default.aspx
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Study shows Rhode Island Smoking Ban Reduced Hospital Admissions for Heart Attack and Related Costs

HomeNewsStudy shows Rhode Island Smoking Ban Reduced Hospital Admissions for Heart Attack and Related Costs

February 15, 2012   A new study from the Rhode Island Department of Health (HEALTH) shows that Rhode Island hospitalization rates for acute myocardial infarction (AMI), commonly known as heart attack, and associated costs have been on the decline since the state’s Smoke-Free Public Places and Workplaces Act took effect in 2005. Published in the journal of Medicine and Health Rhode Island, “The Impact of Rhode Island’s Statewide Smoke-Free Ordinance on Hospital Admissions and Costs for Acute Myocardial Infarction and Asthma” compares the rates of the two conditions against a control group, hospitalization for appendicitis during a span of time between 2003, before the legislation was passed, and 2009, four years after the ban took effect. The findings reveal a 28.4 percent drop in the rate of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) admissions and a 14.6 percent reduction in total associated cost, representing a potential savings of over six million dollars.

For More Information:
http://www.ri.gov/press/view/15878

Feb 17, 2012
Why All Hospital Campuses Should be Smoke-Free
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Tobacco Added in to the Cocktail Mix
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Electronic Cigarette Explodes in Man’s Mouth
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Risk Of Heart Attack And Early Death Increases With Cellular Aging

Main Category: Genetics
Also Included In: Cardiovascular / Cardiology;  Smoking / Quit Smoking;  Obesity / Weight Loss / Fitness
Article Date: 18 Feb 2012 – 0:00 PST

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Every cell in the body has chromosomes with so-called telomeres, which are shortened over time and also through lifestyle choices such as smoking and obesity. Researchers have long speculated that the shortening of telomeres increases the risk of heart attack and early death. Now a large-scale population study in Denmark involving nearly 20,000 people shows that there is in fact a direct link, and has also given physicians a future way to test the actual cellular health of a person.

In an ongoing study of almost 20,000 Danes, a team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen have isolated each individual’s DNA to analyse their specific telomere length – a measurement of cellular aging.

“The risk of heart attack or early death is present whether your telomeres are shortened due to lifestyle or due to high age,” says Clinical Professor of Genetic Epidemiology Borge Nordestgaard from the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen. Professor Nordestgaard is also a chief physician at Copenhagen University Hospital, where he and colleagues conduct large scale studies of groups of tens of thousands of Danes over several decades.

Lifestyle can affect cellular aging

The recent “Copenhagen General Population Study” involved almost 20,000 people, some of which were followed during almost 19 years, and the conclusion was clear: If the telomere length was short, the risk of heart attack and early death was increased by 50 and 25 per cent, respectively.

“That smoking and obesity increases the risk of heart disease has been known for a while. We have now shown, as has been speculated, that the increased risk is directly related to the shortening of the protective telomeres – so you can say that smoking and obesity ages the body on a cellular level, just as surely as the passing of time,” says Borge Nordestgaard.

One in four Danes has short telomeres

The study also revealed that one in four Danes has telomeres with such short length that not only will they statistically die before their time, but their risk of heart attack is also increased by almost 50 per cent.

“Future studies will have to reveal the actual molecular mechanism by which the short telomere length causes heart attacks,” says Borge Nordestgaard, and asks, “Does one cause the other or is the telomere length and the coronary event both indicative of a third – yet unknown – mechanism?”

Another possible prospect of the study is that general practitioners could conduct simple blood tests to reveal a person’s telomere length and thereby the cellular wear and age.

Article adapted by Medical News Today from original press release. Click ‘references’ tab above for source.
Visit our genetics section for the latest news on this subject. The study “Short Telomere Length, Myocardial Infarction, Ischemic Heart Disease, and Early Death” is scheduled for the March issue of the journal Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology published by the American Heart Association. The March issue will mail on 16 February 2012, and the journal article is also available online.
University of Copenhagen Please use one of the following formats to cite this article in your essay, paper or report:

MLA

University of Copenhagen. “Risk Of Heart Attack And Early Death Increases With Cellular Aging.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 18 Feb. 2012. Web.
19 Feb. 2012. APA

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View the original article here